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What's Your Sleeping Pattern?

Tell us about your sleep and we’ll tell you how to retune your sleeping pattern.

TAKE THE QUIZ What's a sleeping pattern? What's a sleeping pattern?

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LET'S GO
What time do you go to sleep?



And get up?
Mmm. I have no set times

20:45 ampm

06:45 ampm

In the two hours before you go to bed, do you...

Select as many as apply

  • Eat a meal
  • Have a bath
  • Watch TV
  • Drink - alcohol or coffee
  • Smoke
  • Work
  • Read a book
  • Play on my mobile phone
  • Exercise
  • Use PC
  • None of these
  • Eat a meal
  • Have a bath
  • Watch TV
  • Drink alcohol or coffee
  • Smoke
  • Work
  • Read a book
  • Mobile phone
  • Exercise
  • Use PC
  • None of these

How long does it usually take you to fall asleep?

Select one that applies

  • Straight away
  • Under 20 mins
  • Feels like forever

Sleep Fact

If you sleep straight away you might be sleep deprived. It should take 10-20 minutes to fall asleep naturally.

Sleep Fact

Can't sleep? The sounds of nature are more likely to lull you to sleep than the sounds of silence.

Do you usually wake up during the night?

Select one that applies

  • Not me
  • Maybe once or twice
  • I wake up constantly

Who else is in your bed?

Select as many as apply

  • Just me
  • Partner
  • Child
  • Pet

What position do you usually sleep in?

Select one that applies

  • Side
  • Tummy
  • Back
  • Foetal
  • Starfish
  • Can't get comfy

Sleep Fact

During deep sleep we can still move around and change positions. In REM sleep, our bodies are 'paralysed', even though our eyes are moving and we are actively dreaming.

How do you rate your mattress?

Select one that applies

How do you usually wake up?

Select one that applies

  • My natural body clock
  • My alarm
  • I hit the snooze button
  • None of these
  • I wake before my alarm

Do you ever...

Select as many as apply

  • Nap during the day
  • Sleep in late
  • Neither

...a bit about you...

Is anything troubling your sleep?

Select as many as apply

  • Worry
  • Overactive bladder
  • Back or neck pain
  • Snoring partner
  • Snoring (me)
  • Menopause
  • Pain or tingling legs
  • Allergy or eczema
  • Too hot or cold
  • Pregnancy
  • None of these
  • Worry
  • Overactive bladder
  • Back or neck pain
  • Snoring partner
  • Snoring (me)
  • Menopause
  • Pain or tingling legs
  • Allergy or eczema
  • Too hot or cold
  • Pregnancy
  • None of these

Are you...

Select as many as apply

  • Working shifts
  • Retired
  • Parent of a baby
  • Studying
  • None of these

Finally, the big question...

How do you feel when you wake up?

I just want to go back to bed
I'm ready to get up and go

Sleep Fact

The further east you live the more likely you are to be an early bird - because the sun rises earlier!

, you are a .

Your natural 24 hr body clock (circadian rhythm) is in a slightly later time zone than everyone else. This means that you don’t feel naturally tired until late at night. Owls are not at their best first thing and likely to rise a little later than most people, but this becomes a problem if you still have to get up early as it could mean that you’re not getting enough sleep. Read this report, we’ve got some great advice for you Night Owls...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Although you go to bed later than most, you complete 5 cycles of normal sleep with plenty of restorative Deep Sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

Your natural 24 hr body clock (circadian rhythm) is in a slightly later time zone than everyone else. This means that you don’t feel naturally tired until late at night. Owls are not at their best first thing and likely to rise a little later than most people, but this becomes a problem if you still have to get up early as it could mean that you’re not getting enough sleep. Read this report, we’ve got some great advice for you Night Owls...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You go to bed later than most and wake before you’ve completed 5 cycles of normal sleep. Looks like you’re missing out on the some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

Your natural 24 hr body clock (circadian rhythm) is in a slightly earlier time zone than everyone else. This means that you feel tired earlier in the evening, but bounce out of bed like a lark in the morning feeling wide awake! Most people envy you, but just a little tip, larks don’t do well with late nights so listen to your body clock and turn in when you’re tired. This report will tell you how...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Because you’re asleep earlier than most, you complete 5 cycles of normal sleep with plenty of restorative Deep Sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

Your natural 24 hr body clock (circadian rhythm) is in a slightly earlier time zone than everyone else. This means that you feel tired earlier in the evening, but bounce out of bed like a lark in the morning feeling wide awake! Most people envy you, but just a little tip, larks don’t do well with late nights so listen to your body clock and turn in when you’re tired. This report will tell you how...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Because you wake early you don’t get 8 hours sleep so you’re missing out on some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

You’re one of those people who can sleep through anything – including the alarm – but in spite of this when you do finally stir from your slumbers you still don’t feel great. It could just be that you’re trying to rouse yourself in the deepest phase of your sleep cycle when your brain is least alert. You need to adjust your sleep so that you’re ready to wake up at the right time. This report will tell you how...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You don’t fall into deep sleep until later in your sleep so you are forced to interrupt this restorative deep sleep stage when you wake after 8 hours.

You’re one of those people who can sleep through anything – including the alarm – but in spite of this when you do finally stir from your slumbers you still don’t feel great. It could just be that you’re trying to rouse yourself in the deepest phase of your sleep cycle when your brain is least alert. You need to adjust your sleep so that you’re ready to wake up at the right time. This report will tell you how...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You don’t fall into deep sleep until later in your sleep so you are forced to interrupt this restorative deep sleep stage when you wake after less than 8 hours.

It seems that as quickly as you descend into the Land of Nod, you bounce back up into wakefulness. You may not mind being a Light Sleeper, but the fact is that something, or someone is preventing you from drifting off into a really deep slumber. Only deep sleep gives you the truly restorative benefits of a good night’s sleep so you need to retrain yourself to be a Deep Sleeper. This report will give you some helpful tips...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Although you’re sleeping for 8 hours, you’re not getting enough cycles of restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

It seems that as quickly as you descend into the Land of Nod, you bounce back up into wakefulness. You may not mind being a Light Sleeper, but the fact is that something, or someone is preventing you from drifting off into a really deep slumber. Only deep sleep gives you the truly restorative benefits of a good night’s sleep so you need to retrain yourself to be a Deep Sleeper. This report will give you some helpful tips...

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You’re getting less than 8 hours sleep and missing out on cycles of restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

Your mind is constantly on the go. Either you can’t get to sleep, or you get to sleep only to wake up again in the early hours. It means that your brain is staying alert long after the urge to sleep should have taken over and this is confusing your body clock. The longer it goes on, the more your sleep pattern will be out of whack and you will miss out on the truly restorative benefits of deep sleep. Read on, we’ve got some tips to help get that over worked mind of yours off to sleep.

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Although you’re sleeping for 8 hours, you’re not getting enough cycles of restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

Your mind is constantly on the go. Either you can’t get to sleep, or you get to sleep only to wake up again in the early hours. It means that your brain is staying alert long after the urge to sleep should have taken over and this is confusing your body clock. The longer it goes on, the more your sleep pattern will be out of whack and you will miss out on the truly restorative benefits of deep sleep. Read on, we’ve got some tips to help get that over worked mind of yours off to sleep.

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You’re not completing 5 cycles of sleep so missing out on restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

You burn the candle at both ends for most of the week then try to catch up the lost hours of sleep on your days off. It’s a great plan, but unfortunately it doesn’t work because you can only catch up on sleep in a 24 hour period. What’s more, when you do lie in it just confuses your body clock and you’ll end up feeling extra groggy when it’s time to go back to work. You’re probably suffering from Social Jet Lag, so read this report and we’ll tell you have to get back into a healthy sleep zone!

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You are not allowing yourself enough time to complete 5 cycles of normal sleep, so you’re missing out on the some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

You burn the candle at both ends for most of the week then try to catch up the lost hours of sleep on your days off. It’s a great plan, but unfortunately it doesn’t work because you can only catch up on sleep in a 24 hour period. What’s more, when you do lie in it just confuses your body clock and you’ll end up feeling extra groggy when it’s time to go back to work. You’re probably suffering from Social Jet Lag, so read this report and we’ll tell you have to get back into a healthy sleep zone!

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You are not allowing yourself enough time to complete 5 cycles of normal sleep, so you’re missing out on the some restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs.

It seems you just can’t stay in one position long enough to relax into sleep or stay asleep. Something is preventing you from getting comfy, which is disrupting your sleep pattern and that probably means you’re missing out on the really deep, restorative sleep you need. Okay, so you probably know this already! But read on for help to put a stop to your wriggling and rediscover a good night’s sleep.

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You’re not completing 5 cycles of sleep so missing out on restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

It seems you just can’t stay in one position long enough to relax into sleep or stay asleep. Something is preventing you from getting comfy, which is disrupting your sleep pattern and that probably means you’re missing out on the really deep, restorative sleep you need. Okay, so you probably know this already! But read on for help to put a stop to your wriggling and rediscover a good night’s sleep.

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: You’re not completing 5 cycles of sleep so missing out on restorative Stage 3 and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

You break all the rules of sleep. You vary your bed times, steal sleep for work and pleasure and have probably set your body clock into a complete spin! You may feel great, but you’re probably not recognising the effect this is having on your performance and your health. You could get so much more from your waking hours if you took better care of your sleep. Read on for some simple tips and quick wins. Try them for just a week and let us know if it’s helped you sleep better ... and feel better!

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Whoa. Your sleep pattern is off the scale! This is what it SHOULD look like. 5 complete cycles of deep restorative stage 3 sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

You break all the rules of sleep. You vary your bed times, steal sleep for work and pleasure and have probably set your body clock into a complete spin! You may feel great, but you’re probably not recognising the effect this is having on your performance and your health. You could get so much more from your waking hours if you took better care of your sleep. Read on for some simple tips and quick wins. Try them for just a week and let us know if it’s helped you sleep better ... and feel better!

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Whoa. Your sleep pattern is off the scale! This is what it SHOULD look like. 5 complete cycles of deep restorative stage 3 sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

You’ve nailed it. You are totally in tune with your natural body clock and your sleep pattern is near perfect. You gently drift into sleep, you dream, you regenerate, you wake naturally and rise out of bed rejuvenated and ready for another day – at your sparkling best!

Congratulations. We’d love to know more about your tips for great sleep. Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com, or share your valuable tips using .

Your Sleep Pattern Explained: Perfect! 5 complete cycles of deep restorative stage 3 sleep and mind and mood-boosting REMs sleep.

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  • You
  • Normal sleep

Please note. This sleep pattern is suggestive of your sleep based on responses given. It may not be wholly accurate and if you have concerns about sleep you should seek medical advice.


Your Responses in Detail

Sleep – you need it!

We are wired for sleep, 8 hours of quality sleep night. Cycles of regenerative Deep Sleep, when energy levels are restored and your body repairs itself ready for another day. Followed by lovely mind and mood-boosting REMs (Rapid Eye Movement) Sleep where memories are laid down from the previous day, reinforcing learning and clearing the way for new experiences.

Great quality sleep makes you smarter, happier, more creative, less stressed and less likely to suffer from infections and a whole host of diseases. You will score higher in exams, have faster reaction times, better sex, be less likely to argue with you partner – and even lose weight! Who wouldn’t want that!

If you miss out – even by 1 hour – or your sleep is poor quality, you’re heading for trouble. Check your responses now.

You sleep for at least 7 hours

Great! Healthy adults need to sleep for about 7-9 hours in every 24. Check the rest of your answers to make sure you’re getting quality sleep as well as quantity!

Read more

FACTS: Healthy adults need 7-9 hours’ sleep (7-8 for over 65s). Teenagers need 8-10. Children 9-13 hours and babies 11-17 hours. But these are averages – it’s quite normal to need more than that, but it isn’t okay to manage on less.

Lose just 1 hour a night and you will begin to feel the effects of sleep deprivation – that’s the case for most Britons where the average is 6.8 hours - an hour less than recommended.

Only 3% of people carry a gene that means they can stay healthy on 6 hours sleep – it’s unlikely that you’re one of them! Source. National Sleep Foundation

You sleep for less than 7 hours

This is below the 7-9 hours needed by 97% of people. You might think an hour or two doesn’t make a difference but it has a cumulative effective over a week and a half – by the 10th night it is equivalent to having stayed awake for 24 hours. In another study after 17 hours of waking, reaction times were halved!

Read more

FACTS: Healthy adults need 7-9 hours’ sleep (7-8 for over 65s). Teenagers need 8-10. Children 9-13 hours and babies 11-17 hours. But these are averages – it’s quite normal to need more than that, but it isn’t okay to manage on less.

Lose just 1 hour a night and you will begin to feel the effects of sleep deprivation – that’s the case for most Britons where the average is 6.8 hours an hour less than recommended.

Only 3% of people carry a gene that means they can stay healthy on 6 hours sleep – it’s unlikely that you’re one of them! Source. National Sleep Foundation

  • You excerise

    Exercise improves the quality of sleep as it tires you and also reduces stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline – which have a positive, mood-lifting effect. As your body temperature cools post exercise, this can also trigger your brain to prepare for sleep. If vigorous exercise before bedtime keeps you awake it could be that you’re pumped up adrenaline levels are overcoming the natural urge to sleep. If that’s the case try exercising earlier in the day. However, the overall benefits of exercise are so great that best advice is to not to give it up.

    Read more

    TIP: Avoid performance supplements such as nitrous oxide, creatine and stimulants which will keep you awake!

  • You sleep in the chair

    Falling asleep in front of the TV is not good for your posture and you might be more likely to snore. Added to this, it’s likely that you’re not enjoying deep restorative sleep when sitting in the chair, so it’s not adding much to your 8 hours of quality sleep. If you feel like nodding off, head for bed!

    Read more

    TIP: If you’re prone to nodding off in the evening, set your timer for 30 minutes so you don’t fall into deep sleep. If you’re still tired when you wake up – head up to bed.

  • You work

    If you work late, you will go to bed with thoughts of tomorrow buzzing in your head. Winding down is an important part of the natural sleep/wake cycle as you relax and allow the drive to sleep gently overwhelm you. Added to this, if you’re using a computer then be aware that the blue light emitted from your screen is cancelling out the production of sleep-inducing melatonin hormone. So try to switch off at couple of hours before bed.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • Take regular short breaks during the working day – it helps regulate the pace of your work
    • Dedicate the last hour of your working day to something menial and make a ‘to do’ list for the next day
    • Plan activities for the evenings when you get home, socialise, exercise, cleaning – try and do something that’s the complete opposite of what you do at work, for example, if your job involves sitting at a desk, do something physical.
    • DON’T check your emails before you go to bed!
    • Try not to obsess about getting to sleep – people with insomnia are so super focused on the fact that they’re not getting enough sleep that they actually stay awake worrying about it!

    FACT: It’s pays to take a break. A study into work-life balance by accountants Ernst & Young found that for every additional 10 hours of time off taken, employees’ annual performance ratings improved by 8%. Tell us how you switch off from work. Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com, or share your valuable tips using

  • You watch TV/Internet/Games

    You might think you’re unwinding at the end of the day, but beware - the blue light emitted from your screen is cancelling out the production of sleep-inducing melatonin hormones and tricking your body clock into staying alert for longer. So power down early if you want to guarantee sleep.

    Read more

    TIP: Place a candle next to your screen (not recommended in the bedroom!) so that your eyes are less concentrated on the blue light from the computer screen!

    FACT: A bedtime story. Neuroscientists at Thomas Jefferson University compared the effects of reading a book on a blue light-emitting device compared with a printed book. The people who read the device were more alert at bedtime, took longer to fall asleep and found it harder to wake up after 8 hours sleep.

  • You eat a meal

    A heavy meal and a full stomach can lead to bloating and indigestion which will likely keep you awake. However, going to bed hungry is not a good idea either as your brain will focus on food, not sleep. Go for something light that’s high in carbs.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • Eat these:
    • A bowl of cereal or muffin – with low fat milk (easier to digest)
    • A banana – they contain magnesium mineral which is a natural muscle relaxant
    • Anything containing tryptophan – this is an amino acid that has strong sleep-inducing effects and helps to produce the hormone serotonin (important in REMs sleep). Find it in milk, almonds, chicken, yoghurt, bananas
    • Avoid these:
    • Spicy food - these foods contain spices that boost metabolism and raise your body temperature – the opposite of what you need to sleep
    • High fat foods – they are harder to digest
    • High protein foods – they give you a rush of amino acid and reduce the ratio of sleep-inducing tryptophan in your blood
    • Chocolate – the caffeine levels will keep you awake!
    • Pizza – the cheese is slow to digest and the high acid content may give you reflux at night.

    FACT: Kiwi fruit contain serotonin and in one study, people who ate kiwi fruit fell asleep 35% faster than those who didn’t!

  • You drink coffee

    Most people know that caffeine and sleep do not go together. Why? Because caffeine stimulates the production of the wakefulness hormones – adenosine and cortisol. Same applies for other drinks with caffeine, including tea, cola and energy drinks. Scientists also think that day time consumption of coffee can also affect sleep quality, so if you are suffering from sleep problems cutting back on coffee could be a simple first step.

    Read more

    TIP: Instead try Chamomile tea – it’s not called ‘sleep tea’ for nothing! – you can also try passion flower, Lemon balm and valerian tea. If you’re going out for a meal, take a tea bag with you and ask for a cup of hot water instead of a coffee after the meal.

    FACT: It is possible to become caffeine tolerant where you no longer feel the effects of coffee and feel you need more caffeine to get the boost. This can happen on regular consumption of just 4 cups a day.

  • You drink alcohol

    Unfortunately, alcohol helps us go to sleep but is has a very disruptive effect on quality of sleep. Alcohol works by supressing our brain’s natural alert functions and acts as a sedative in the short term. However, in an attempt to overcome the effects, our brains start to produce more of the chemicals that improve our alertness – after a few hours these kick in. The result being you won’t fall into a deep restorative sleep and may even wake up after just a few hours. The only solution if you need to be up and alert the following morning is to try to have your last drink several hours before bed.

    Read more

    FACT: Do nightcaps work? Some bartenders recommend a single shot of neat alcohol, whisky, vodka or whatever, served at room temperature. The instant hit of strong alcohol will wake you up enough to realise that it makes more sense to go home than to carry on drinking.

  • You smoke

    Nicotine is a stimulant and has been shown to increase insomnia. People who smoke are more likely suffer from sleep problems than people who don’t and this includes insomnia, disrupted sleep and breathing problems such as sleep apnoea. The reason is that although nicotine has a short-lasting sedative effect, it is also a stimulant and triggers the production of adrenaline – which prevents sleep. Vaping has the same effect.

    Read more

    FACT: Sometimes 24 hour nicotine patches cause vivid dreams because our brains aren’t used to nicotine through the night and it effects REMs sleep.

    TIP: Talk to a doctor about your smoking and sleep problems.

  • You enjoy a bath

    This can be a great part of your bedtime routine. However, if you bath is too hot it may keep you awake – we can only fall asleep when our body temperature cools slightly.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • Cool down for 20 minutes after a hot bath before going to bed
    • Add a couple of drops of lavender oil – it is thought to slow activity of the nervous system

  • You meditate

    Congratulations. These are all great sleep-inducing activities and exactly what you should be doing at this stage in your sleep/wake cycle if you want the best chance of a great night’s sleep.

    Read more

    TIP: Light stimulates your sleep body clock. Keep lighting low in the evening to allow the sleep-inducing hormone melatonin to build up. Watch out for computers and mobile phones, the blue light emitted from the screens also blocks the production of melatonin.

    FACT: A bedtime story. Neuroscientists at Thomas Jefferson University compared the effects of reading a book on a blue light-emitting device compared with a printed book. The people who read the device were more alert at bedtime, took longer to fall asleep and found it harder to wake up after 8 hours sleep.

You go to sleep immediately

If you nod off as soon as your head hits the pillow, it could be that you are suffering sleep deprivation. Other signs might be feeling drowsy during the day and falling asleep on the train/bus on the way to work. Ideally, it should take 10-20 minutes to fall asleep naturally.

You take 20 minutes or less to get to sleep

Well done! Most people need to relax and allow the sleep inducing hormones to gently overcome the drive to stay alert. Your body clock drives this process, so just enjoy the peace and comfort of your bed and sleep will come naturally.

What can I do?
You find it difficult to get to sleep

It should take less than 20 minutes to drift off, so either your body’s not ready for sleep yet, or something’s keeping you awake. Whichever, don’t lie in bed stressing – get up! Then do something about it.

What can I do?

Good news. Difficulty getting to sleep is fixable, but first you’ve got to find out what’s causing it – often it’s just a bad bedtime routine or a poor sleep environment – and that includes an uncomfortable mattress by the way! But there are other causes of insomnia, so carry on reading your responses below to learn more about the changes you need to make.

Read more

TIP: Get up and go back through your bedtime routine. Maybe have a drink - try Chamomile tea – it’s not called ‘sleep tea’ for nothing! Read a book, but don’t switch the lights on or turn on your computer or mobile phone – the light will stop the production of sleep-inducing melatonin hormones and keep you awake longer.

What’s your Sleep secret? Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com, or share your valuable tips using .

You wake up once a night or less

It’s natural to wake up – most people do at least once as quality sleep consists of up to 5 natural sleep cycles which descend up and down from near wakefulness through to deep sleep. If you have to go for a bathroom break, that’s fine too.

Read more

TIP: Don’t drink water for 3 hours before going to bed. Stay well hydrated during the day and you won’t need to take a glass of water to bed with you.

You wake several times during the night

Waking occasionally can be quite normal, but for most people frequent waking can disturb the natural rhythm of your sleep. Good quality sleep consists of up to 5 natural cycles, each lasting about 90 minutes. Waking up during a sleep cycle likely means you’re missing out on the important restorative deep sleep and mind and mood-boosting REM sleep phases.

Common causes are anxiety, stress, uncomfortable mattress (you’re in the right place for help with that ☺), medications, alcohol or drugs, pain, being too hot or too cold, noisy or disruptive environment. The rest of your responses will give important clues as to what’s keeping you awake and what you can do.

Read more

TIPS:

  • Don’t look at the clock!
  • Don’t switch on bright lights - it disrupts the production of sleep-inducing hormone melatonin and will make it harder to get back to sleep
  • Don’t drink water for 3 hours before going to bed. Stay well hydrated during the day and you won’t need to take a glass of water to bed with you.
  • Natural light controls our body clock. Going for a walk in the middle of the day will help reset your clock so you sleep better at night.
  • Try not to obsess about getting to sleep – people with insomnia are so super focused on the fact that they’re not getting enough sleep that they actually stay awake worrying about it!

FACT: If your sleep is frequently interrupted you won’t be getting enough REMs sleep and so will have fewer dreams. Put your alarm forward an extra 30 minutes will give you some extra REMs sleep after an interrupted night – you will feel better already.

In the bed there is:
  • Just you

    Excellent, you only have your own sleep pattern to worry about so there is no excuse!

  • Partner

    Although intimacy doesn’t prevent a good night’s sleep, there are plenty of other reasons why a bed partner might be cramping your sleeping style. The chances are they have a different sleep pattern, as well as different bedtime routine, so we recommend you encourage them to take this quiz as well and then work through the advice together!

  • A child

    The arrival of a new baby is almost certainly going to disrupt your sleep patterns and most parents will suffer from sleep deprivation during the first year. However, good sleeping practices start from birth and there is plenty of advice about how to get your baby into a good routine. Almost all experts agree that allowing the child to sleep in your bed is a bad idea and in the end no one will get a good night’s sleep. Read our blog here by (Andrea Grace).

    Read more

    FACT: A new baby has a lot more REMs sleep than adults. This is when their brains learn and is an important part of development.

  • A pet

    You are not alone. A recent survey showed up to 50% of pet owners allow their dogs and cats to share the bed with them. The biggest problem is that they can wake you during the night and disturb your sleep pattern, which means you’re likely missing out on essential restorative sleep stages. Should you keep your pet in the bed? Experts say not.Excellent, you only have your own sleep pattern to worry about so there is no excuse!

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • Start as you mean to go on, train you pet from the outset not to sleep on the bed. For example, the best time to train puppies learn up to the age of 16 weeks.
    • For older pets, get them somewhere else to sleep that’s just as comfortable as your bed and be firm.
    • Try it for a week and let us know how you get on. We’d love to hear you tips too! Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com, or share your valuable tips using .

    FACT: Dogs dream too. Just like us they have REMs sleep, but their dreams tend to be shorter – just a couple of minutes (the smaller the dog the shorter the dream). They probably dream about the events of the day!

You sleep in the tummy position

This is the worst position to sleep in, especially if you suffer from lower back pain. Your spine is not supported and you will twist your head to one side to breath. On the plus side, it can mean you are less likely to snore or suffer from sleep apnoea but overall we don’t recommend it and the best position is one that supports the natural curvature of your spine (side and back are better).

Read more

TIP: If you must sleep on your tummy, use a flatter pillow or put a pillow under your pelvis, this will help to keep your spine in a more natural shape.

FACTS:

  • Of course, we don’t really know what position we sleep in all night. During deep, non-REM sleep we can still move around and change positions. During REM sleep, our bodies are ‘paralysed’, even though our eyes are moving and actively dreaming.
  • We change positions during brief periods of arousal during deep sleep. Some studies show that men are more likely to move than women – possibly a primitive instinct to keep watch at night?

You sleep on your side

You’re in a good position. Your spine is held in a natural curve – similar to the standing position – and so this is least likely to cause back or neck pain. You’re also less likely to have breathing problems, such as snoring or sleep apnoea.

Which side? Sleeping on your left side improves circulation to the heart and also reduces heart burn and indigestion. Sleeping on your right side reduces pressure on lungs.

Read more

TIPS:

  • Don’t rest one arm under your head if you want to avoid neck and shoulder pain in the morning.
  • If you suffer from back pain, draw your knees up slightly and place a pillow long ways between them.

FACTS:

  • Of course, we don’t really know what position we sleep in all night. During deep, non-REM sleep we can still move around and change positions. During REM sleep, our bodies are ‘paralysed’, even though our eyes are moving and actively dreaming.
  • We change positions during brief periods of arousal during deep sleep. Some studies show that men are more likely to move than women – possibly a primitive instinct to keep watch at night?

You sleep on your back

If you’re a back sleeper you are in the minority. You are also more likely to snore in this position, or worse, suffer from sleep apnoea – a dangerous condition where you stop breathing for periods of time which can also impact on the quality of your sleep. On the plus side, it is good for your back as it keeps it nice and straight – but only if you’re lying on a mattress with good support!

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TIPS:

  • Use a flat pillow to avoid your head being pushed upright – this will help prevent neck pain.
  • If you want to wake up with a wrinkle-free face – sleep on your back!

FACTS:

  • Of course, we don’t really know what position we sleep in all night. During deep, non-REM sleep we can still move around and change positions. During REM sleep, our bodies are ‘paralysed’, even though our eyes are moving and actively dreaming.
  • We change positions during brief periods of arousal during deep sleep. Some studies show that men are more likely to move than women – possibly a primitive instinct to keep watch at night?

You sleep in the foetal position

This is popular sleep position and is particularly good for pregnant women as it increases circulation to the heart (for both mum and baby). You’re also less likely to have breathing problems, such as snoring or sleep apnoea.

Which side? Sleeping on your left side improves circulation to the heart and also reduces heart burn and indigestion. Sleeping on your right side reduces pressure on lungs.

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TIP: Don’t rest one arm under your head if you want to avoid neck and shoulder pain in the morning.

FACTS:

  • Of course, we don’t really know what position we sleep in all night. During deep, non-REM sleep we can still move around and change positions. During REM sleep, our bodies are ‘paralysed’, even though our eyes are moving and actively dreaming.
  • We change positions during brief periods of arousal during deep sleep. Some studies show that men are more likely to move than women – possibly a primitive instinct to keep watch at night?

You can’t get comfy

Are you shifting around a lot at night? If so it could be a sign that your mattress is not allowing you to get comfortable.

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TIPS:

  • Try a different sleep position each night for the next few nights and see which allows you to sleep.
  • Try sleeping with one less pillow, they bend your neck and twist you spine whichever sleep position you’re in.

FACTS:

  • Of course, we don’t really know what position we sleep in all night. During deep, non-REM sleep we can still move around and change positions. During REM sleep, our bodies are ‘paralysed’, even though our eyes are moving and actively dreaming.
  • We change positions during brief periods of arousal during deep sleep. Some studies show that men are more likely to move than women – possibly a primitive instinct to keep watch at night?

You have a SIMBA mattress!

Yay! Thank you for buying a SIMBA mattress. We certainly hope you’re loving it as much as you should. Your opinion matters most of all, so keep us posted with any feedback. Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com or .

You LOVE your mattress

Great! We wish you a long and happy relationship, but remember sooner or later it will have to end. Mattresses lose their support over time and have to be replaced, so please keep us in mind when the time comes.

You HATE your mattress

Oops! You deserve better so maybe it’s time to end this unhappy relationship with your mattress. Here’s a little incentive to encourage you to make SIMBA the new mattress in your life. Why SIMBA? - We’ll let our customers answer that.

You find your mattress JUST OKAY

Mmm! You deserve the best, so don’t compromise your high standards with a sub standard mattress. Here’s a little incentive to encourage you to make SIMBA the new mattress in your life. Why SIMBA? - We’ll let our customers answer that.

You wake before the alarm

Chances are you’ve had a good night’s sleep and woken up naturally – you should be feeling refreshed and alert within half an hour of rising.

You wake too early and lie awake

This is very frustrating and means you’re missing out important restorative sleep. Remember, you need on average 7-9 hours and a good night’s sleep consists of 90 minute cycles, each one as important as the next. If you feel tired during the day, then you need to find out what’s waking you so early – there are many possible causes but anxiety, stress, noise, natural light, uncomfortable sleep environment and drugs or medication are the most common. Some of your earlier responses will have given you some advice for this.

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TIPS:

  • Natural light controls our body clock and people wake earlier when the sun rises earlier. Use black out blinds, especially during the summer months.
  • We wake when our alert signals are stronger than our desire to sleep. That’s why it can be difficult to get back to sleep if you wake early. If you still feel tired, aim for a nap early afternoon when your alert levels naturally dip again.

You are woken by the alarm

Your body clock is programmed to wake up slowly and at the time when we are naturally becoming more alert and less sleepy. Alarm clocks don’t wake us naturally or slowly so it’s possible you’ve interrupted your restorative sleep and you won’t feel fully alert.

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TIP: A loud noise, like an alarm, is a signal of danger. You will wake to an early boost of stress hormones that can leave you out of sorts for the rest of the day. Set your alarm signal to one of your favourite tunes and you’ll wake up feeling calmer and happier!

You hit the snooze button

Either you have nowhere to go today (lucky you), or more likely your alarm clock is totally out of whack with your body clock. Your sleep drive is still overwhelming your body clock’s natural wakefulness and so you are simply not ready to wake. Depending on what time you went to sleep, and how well you slept, snoozing through the alarm is a sign of a badly disrupted sleep pattern and you are probably trying to waken during the deep restorative phases of sleep, which should normally happen earlier in the night. This will leave you with a sleep debt and tiredness throughout the day. Check the rest of your responses for advice on how to improve the quality of your sleep.

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TIP: If you must snooze, aim for a 30 minute micro sleep – that’s enough time to get some mind-boosting REMs sleep and dreams.

You nap during the day

Daytime naps – or power naps – can be a great way to restore energy and alertness – scientists say it’s not essential to take your 8 hours in one hit. In some cultures bi-phasic sleep (twice a day) is seen as the norm. But excessive napping without feeling refreshed could be a sign of sleep deprivation.

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TIPS:

  • The best time for a daytime nap is between 1-3pm when our alert levels naturally dip – Siesta time!
  • Keep power naps to less than 30 minutes or will fall into a deep sleep and waken feeling worse.
  • If you constantly tired, you need to increase the amount of sleep you get each night. Even 30 minutes could make a difference. Try it for a week.

FACTS: The dangers of daytime sleepiness

  • According to ROSPA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents) 20% of road accidents are sleep-related – either drivers being tired or nodding off completely.
  • In one study in America, 1 in 6 people said they nodded off on the train, or at their desk you as a result of sleep deprivation.

You lie in wherever possible

Beware of ‘catching up’ on sleep at the weekends – it’s a myth and a long lazy lie in will disrupt your sleep pattern and leave you feeling groggy on Monday morning. Keep sleep times regular over the weekend – look on the bright side you have more time on your hands so start planning what to do with your Sunday mornings!

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FACT: Lying in for just two hours extra at the weekends can lead to ‘social jet lag’ – that means your sleep pattern is already disrupted.

TIP: It is more important to get up at the same time every day than it is to go to bed at the same time. Try to keep your next lie in to an hour and see how you feel afterwards.

We’d love to hear how you got on too! Send us an email at hello@simbasleep.com, or share your experience using .

  • You are troubled by worry

    Mental health problems such as stress and anxiety can lead to insomnia. Unfortunately, insomnia can also be a cause of stress and people may be more likely to develop depression, so it can be a vicious cycle. If you’re not sure, seek medical advice – you can also check these organisations for helpful advice:

    Samaritans: View link

    NHS Choices: View link

    Mental Health Foundation: View link

    Together Mental Health Charity: View link

  • You have a medical condition

    There are many illnesses and medical conditions that can interfere with sleep because of pain or other symptoms. Some medicines can cause sleep problems as a side effects, even over the counter medicines sometimes contain caffeine for example, whilst anti-histamines counter the effect of the sleep-inducing hormone, histamine. Check with your pharmacist and always discuss concerns with our doctor and never stop taking medication without medical advice.

    British Pain Society: www.britishpainsociety.org

    NHS Choices: View link

    Mental Health Foundation: View link

    Together Mental Health Charity: View link

  • You are troubled by back pain

    An estimated 51% of British adults suffer back or neck pain at any time. It is a major cause of insomnia, but adjusting your sleep position can be extremely helpful in alleviating pain and also preventing further damage. The best positions to sleep are on your side or on your back. Your spine is held in a natural curve – similar to the standing position – and so this is least likely to cause back or neck pain.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • If you lie on your back, place a pillow under your knees to take pressure off lower pack
    • If you lie on your side, place a pillow between your knees to keep your spine straight
    • Don’t rest with one arm under your head – it can cause neck pain
    • Keep pillows flat to avoid twisting your spine
    • Don’t sleep on your tummy – it’s the worst position for your spine!

  • You snore

    Even though you may think you are sleeping through the night, your snoring may be affecting your sleep quality. You may keep ‘waking yourself’ and which prevents you from falling into deep restorative sleep. This will result in sleep deprivation over time. Try to avoid sleeping on your back or drinking alcohol in the evenings, these cause your tongue and soft palate to ‘collapse’ into your throat, which creates the snoring noise. If your nose is blocked or you have an allergy, try a nasal strip or a treatment to help you breathe more easily. Be careful though as decongestants may contain caffeine. If snoring persists, or you think you are suffering from sleep apnoea (when you stop breathing for periods of time), then seek medical advice.

    Useful websites include www.britishsnoring.co.uk

    Read more

    TIP: Turn on your slide, remove your pillow and place it behind your back to stop you rolling over.

  • Your partner snores

    Oh dear, this can be a tricky subject to raise with your partner, but if their snoring is really bad you could both be suffering from sleep deprivation. Try to encourage them to take action – there is plenty of advice here www.britishsnoring.co.uk. Separate rooms may not be an option, but remember that if you don’t get 8 hours sleep in every 24 you will be carrying a sleep debt and your health and wellbeing could begin to suffer.

    Read more

    TIPS: Try taking a 30 minute micro sleep during the day. The best time to do this is between 1-3pm when your to stay awake naturally dips.

  • You're too hot or too cold

    When you fall asleep your body temperature drops slightly, so if you are too hot then sleep won’t come. Try to keep the bedroom cool and wear light clothing to avoid overheating at night.

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    TIPS:

    • A hot water bottle on your feet can help to reduce body temperature
    • Experts say that sleeping naked helps you to regulate your body temperature for a better night’s sleep.
    • Check your mattress and bedding has breathable fabrics such as cotton. The SIMBA Hybrid Mattress has a hypoallergenic air flow sleep surface provides freshness and temperature control.
    • If you’re too cold, don’t be tempted to turn up the heating. Instead use layers that can easily be removed – remember as you sleep your body temperature will drop and you won’t notice the cold so much.

  • You are pregnant

    For many women, sleep problems start in the first trimester due to hormonal changes and continue to the third trimester as it becomes increasingly uncomfortable. You may also have difficulty regulating your temperature at night, so keep the room cool and wear light clothes.

    Try sleeping in the fetal position to relieve discomfort and improve blood circulation for you and the baby. Other things that have been shown to work include: music therapy, aerobic exercise, massage, progressive muscle relaxation, multi-modal interventions, and the use of a maternity support belt.

    Read more

    TIP: If you have heartburn, sleep on your left side

    FACT: By 30 weeks your baby will be developing a sleep/wake cycle – and dreaming! Babies dream much longer than adults as its important part of learning.

    Got any more tips to share about sleeping in pregnancy? We’d love to hear them or hello@simbasleep.com.

  • You are going through menopause

    Unfortunately many women suffer insomnia during their menopause years and this is due to the changing hormone levels resulting in anxiety and changes in mood. Many women also suffer from uncontrolled temperature spikes (hot flushes) and may have several during the night which cause them to waken even briefly. If this happens you may interrupt the deep, restorative sleep, which could also be a reason why women in menopause often complain of feeling tired. www.womens-health-concern.org

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • One study showed that people who took Valerian had an 80% increased chance of quality sleep – and as it’s a herbal remedy there it’s less likely to cause ‘hangover type’ side effects that some sleep medicines.
    • If you wake with a hot flush, stick one leg out of the bed, it will quickly cool your entire body

  • You have pain or tingling in Your legs

    If you experience pins or needles, or have difficulty keeping your limbs from twitching and moving then you may have a condition called Restless Leg Syndrome. This gets worse at night and can make sleep extremely difficult. The twitching may also wake you up and disrupt the important restorative phases of sleep. Talk to your doctor, they may be able to help.

    Read more

    TIPS: Gentle exercise, such as an evening walk, may help relax you physically for sleep.

  • You have an overactive bladder

    Unfortunately little trips to the toilet can be more frequent as we age and also due to certain conditions, such as pregnancy. Try to keep well hydrated during the day so you can avoid drinking too much in the hours before bedtime - Not drinking enough can also stimulate a sensitive bladder and create the urge to pee. This will help to keep night trips to a minimum. You should also seek advice from your doctor if the problem persists.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • Don’t drink water for 3 hours before bedtime
    • Avoid carbonated drinks and caffeine which can irritate your bladder

  • You suffer from an allergy, e.g. eczema or allergic rhinitis

    Conditions which cause excessive itching, or sneezing have a very negative impact on sleep quantity and quality. Always seek medical advice to reduce the symptoms as much as possible. Keep a diary, your doctor will take into account the effect the condition has on your sleep when deciding the best treatment.

  • You are retired

    Sleep problems are more common in the over 65s, but it’s a myth to suggest that we need less sleep as we age – over 65s need on average 7-8 hours of sleep (compared with other adults who need 7-9). To continue to maintain health and wellbeing, it’s important to encourage a regular sleep pattern that works in harmony with your natural body clock and leaves you feeling fresh and energised every day.

    Read more

    TIPS:

    • If it’s difficult to sleep through the night, try daytime naps. The best time is after lunch when your alert levels naturally dip.
    • Try to get out every day as daylight modifies our body clocks and will help programme you for sleep at night.
    • Use heavy curtains, blinds or eye masks. As we age the skin of our eyelids becomes slightly thinner and we’re more likely to be woken by morning light.
    • Take up exercise – it will improve your sleep!

    FACT: Good quality sleep is believed to fend off diseases such as dementia. The brain restores connections and lays down memories, improving brains ability to perform.

    Got any more tips to share about sleeping in retirement? We’d love to hear them or hello@simbasleep.com.

  • You work shifts

    You have a tough challenge. Shift work means working against the natural rhythm of your body clock and only careful planning and discipline will allow you to ensure you get the quality sleep you need in order to keep fresh and energised for work and social time. Don’t neglect the importance of sleep, it has a huge impact on health and wellbeing.

    Read more

    FACT: Your body clock can only readjust by 1 or 2 hours a day. That means it can take a whole week to recover from the effects of a night shift or jet lag!

    Here is some useful advice for managing sleep when working shifts: www.hse.gov.uk

  • You are studying

    In spite of your study workload, it’s important that you continue to get 8 hours good quality sleep a day to maintain mental agility. Losing just one hour of sleep a night can lead to sleep deprivation and the pre-frontal cortex – the part of the brain responsible for logical thought and reasoning – is particularly vulnerable. So plan for good quality sleep and you will increase your chances of academic success!

    Read more

    TIP: Scientists have proved that people who get a good night’s sleep after learning do better in tests the following day. So if you have an exam, stop revising at 10pm, sleep for 8 hours and you’ll improve your chances of success!

    PS. and stay off your social media and mobile phone – not surprisingly the main cause of sleep deprivation in young people.

    FACT: Teenagers need between 8 and 11 hours sleep

    Got any more tips to share about juggling sleep with revision? We’d love to hear them or hello@simbasleep.com.

  • You are the parent of a young baby

    A new baby is almost certainly going to disrupt your sleep patterns and most parents will suffer from sleep deprivation during the first year. However, good sleeping practices start from birth and there is plenty of advice about how to get your baby into a good routine so you can begin to enjoy the benefits of restorative sleep again. Read our blog here by Andrea Grace.

  • Mostly you feel GREAT when you get up

    Congratulations. You seem to be enjoying the benefits of a good night’s sleep and your health and wellbeing will flourish as a result. Check out the responses to the quiz, there may still be some useful tips for improvement.

    We’d love to hear your advice and tips so contact us at or hello@simbasleep.com. And don’t forget to share this tool with your friends and family.

    Happy Sleeping from the Simba Team ☺.

    Why not celebrate with a new SIMBA Hybrid mattress?

  • Mostly you feel OKAY when you get up

    Okay, so there’s room for improvement here. Hopefully our quiz responses have given you lots of ideas so start putting them into practice and your health and wellbeing should become to improve!

    We’d love to hear how you get on so contact us at or hello@simbasleep.com. And don’t forget to share this tool with your friends and family.

    Happy Sleeping from the Simba Team ☺.

    Why not help things along with a new SIMBA Hybrid mattress?

  • Mostly you still feel TIRED when you get up

    Oh dear. There’s definitely some work to be done here, but take heart, by completing this quiz you have taken the first step towards improving your sleep patterns for good. Follow some of our tips and you’ll be improving your health and wellbeing from day one.

    We’d love to hear how you get on so contact us at or hello@simbasleep.com. And don’t forget to share this tool with your friends and family.

    Happy sleeping from the Simba Team ☺.

    Why not start as you mean to go on, a new SIMBA Hybrid mattress will inspire you to find the perfect night’s sleep.


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